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Philippine weekend

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    Alena Elchaninova 2 years ago Views:

1 Philippine weekend January 2013 Only 13 hours and your mortal bodies can easily be transferred from the slush, dusk, dirty Moscow snow to a beach with yellow sand and obscenely warm water of some Asian-Pacific resort, somewhere on a lost island. Anyone else, but I like this opportunity! Days to get away from the bustle of Moscow, forget about the mountain of unfinished reports, unfinished epoch-making articles, bosses, etc., and just plunge into your favorite business - bird watching and nothing to do in between. To reel in NG - this idea has been in my head for a long time, but given that on the eve of this holiday everything that is possible, from tickets to hotels, soars in price one and a half to two times, it is necessary to prepare for the outcome strongly in advance, in a number cases at the very beginning of the year. Of course, I'm not that pedantic, so I started planning NG-2013 only in July, immediately after returning from Colombia. The options were not very diverse - the most interesting ticket prices were highlighted for Bolivia! Oh Bolivia! Favorite South America! With a creak, I had to refuse - to drag children with me to this country would be the height of madness. For a family vacation, it was necessary to choose more civilian places. at least for now. And just then our native domestic Aeroflot rolled out a special flight for flights to Hong Kong, and on New Year's dates too. It was a sin not to use it))) buying tickets is a matter of minutes, and then a couple of days to analyze the possibilities of where to get out of Hong Kong further. Here the brain is already boiling over the number of possible options and proposals! Cool down quickly - Philippines! Of course, there were doubts about the correctness of the choice! On the one hand, Philae is a tourist power, on the other, on most of the islands, where tourists are actively invited, almost all natural forests have been reduced to zero, and I wanted to kill at least two birds with one stone: rest for the family and watch birds in a new region for myself. Where there are still relatively large forest tracts, i.e. on the large islands - Luzon, Mindanao - the tourism industry was severely limp, and the presence of Maoist and other red-colored partisan separatists did not give much optimism. As a result, the choice fell on the island with the loud name Bohol. There were found quite decent beaches, and a historical component in the form of monuments of the colonial era, and mountain tropical forests, miraculously not cut down, but now naturally protected and protected. I don't want to talk about the resting part at all. I will also write just a couple of sentences about birdwatching. The main attraction is the Rajah Sikatuna National Park. It is located in the inner mountainous part of the island and its main purpose is water protection. The park has a good system of trails, some of them are even marked. But I still recommend using the help of a guide, especially if you stop there for one day.

2 Scheme of trails in the park In the park you can stay with an overnight stay - there is a small bungalow house with two rooms for two people each. Now it seems to me that this is the best option - the bungalow is practically on the edge of the forest and at any moment you can be there in a minute. The only negative is that you need to take food, water, etc. As far as I understand, there are 2 guides who represent what birds are (two in words), most often Rayan Tel is mentioned in Burder reports), but this is only because he speaks English. The second guide was not very good at these skills, but judging by some reviews, he knows a lot more. In general, it's up to you to choose. The forest in the national park is really very interesting, with a pronounced undergrowth. In some places on the slopes with well-visible areas, but in general it is very difficult to observe, and even about photographing and even more should be forgotten. During my visits to the national park, I was not very lucky with the weather, one of the times it rained fine all day long. It is interesting that this day turned out to be the most productive in terms of meetings with all sorts of rarities. But here you have to take their word for it. Photographic evidence was not at all anticipated in such hellish conditions. I will make a small digression on the topic of what the Philippines is for an ornithologist. A quick glance at the map is enough to understand (if you are really interested in nature in general and birds in particular, plus read a little about zoogeography) that you need to go there! And we need not just, but urgently! Indeed, although the listed fauna is not so rich here - only a little more than 600 species, the number of endemics is comparable to the world's most "rich" bird hotspots! There are 194 of them here! Those. consider every third species encountered to be exclusively Filipino! Theoretically, of course))) There is nothing special to do here with a swoop, and acquaintance with all the Philae needs to be carefully planned. It is good that on this reconnaissance trip we managed to communicate with the locals and find out the addresses and attendances of local bird experts who are ready to provide

3 help in Palawan, Mindoro, Cebu and Luzon. So the Philippine frontier will soon be taken by storm. Join us! Here in the park I especially wanted to see several species. Someone was lucky, but with someone not, alas. First of all, I was unlucky with pittas. Although at least 2 species are just common here. The recordings of the voices, previously downloaded and played back with manic regularity, did not help either. Only Pitta steerii answered, but refused to appear. apparently did not know how I was waiting for this moment! The encounters with the local needle-footed owl Ninox philippensis and the scops owl Otus megalotis, active at night, were unexpected. The cloudy weather apparently helped. Well, with a needle-footed owl, there is also a flock of monkeys, which scared her from the day. I noticed! Otus megalotis, Philippine scops owl We also met a group of Samarian hornbeaks (alas, no photo), which delighted not only me, but also Ryan, according to whom no one had seen this rare bird here for almost a year. There are very few photos from the park, I will not show you absolutely technical ones. I will show those where at least a bird can be recognized))))

4 Ceyx argentatus, Silver Kingfisher Treron vernans, Pink-necked Green Pigeon

5 Gallus gallus, Pycnonotus goiavier Bank hen, Brown-crested Bulbul

6 It turned out interestingly with milks. Well, the local long-tailed macaques are understandable, there were a lot of these. Some curious people accompanied me along almost the entire route, which sometimes even annoyed me - because they interfered with their movement among the branches. Macaca fascicularis, Long-tailed macaques,

7 But a couple of meetings with a wool wing turned out to be a pleasant surprise. Before the trip, it seemed to me that finding them would be generally an unrealistic task, but then luck turned out to be on my side. These animals are unique in their biology, perhaps, they are the largest of the planning mammals. They systematically belong to the Dermoptera order of woollywings - exclusively arboreal mammals, with only 2 modern species inhabiting Southeast Asia, capable of gliding due to a leather membrane between the front and hind legs. Together with the primates, they form a single evolutionary branch of Primatomorpha - so that they can be considered their distant relatives, the English-speaking call them "flying lemurs". The animals are exclusively herbivorous. Cynocephalus volans, Filipino Woolwing Woolwing is also found on other Philippine islands, but there is no hunting in Bohol and large birds of prey that regularly hunt this sedentary animal, so it turned out to be easier to see it here. Another primate is the visiting card of the island of Bohol - the Filipino tarsier. Travel business with him is on a grand scale, traveling around the island you can find a lot of offices that offer to "get acquainted" with this animal. To do this, they are caught and kept in small cages, where tourists are allowed to "communicate". If you are ever here, I highly recommend avoiding such establishments! This will help save the lives of many tarsiers. The problem is that they don't live long in captivity - just a couple of months! I just feel sorry for them! Those who are really interested can see them in natural conditions, it will bring much more positive emotions, since the contemplation of oppressed animals from the cages. In the National Park, night safaris are organized every day, on which you can see tarsiers in the natural environment. The areas of their habitat are well known to the guides, so with a certain amount of perseverance you can look at them during the day, although at this time they are inactive, and usually sit quietly somewhere in a fork or under large leaves.

8 Tarsius syrichta, Philippine tarsier Besides the national park, every morning and evening he walked around our hotel. He stood on the outskirts, almost immediately behind him began a palm grove and a small, partially drained patch of mangroves, which every day pleased with some new look. In total, during this New Year's trip to Hong Kong and Bohol, we managed to see 73 species - not so hot, of course. But this is Southeast Asia, not South America)) Sergey Volkov

9 List of species: Latin name English name Russian name Bohol Hong Kong 1 Egretta eulophotes Chinese Egret Yellow-billed Heron Egretta garzetta Little Egret Little Egret Butorides striata Striated Heron Green Heron + 4 Bubulcus coromandus Eastern Cattle Egretta eulophotes Naked Egyptian Quail 6 Milvus migrans Black Kite Black Kite + 7 Amaurornis olivacea Plain Bush-hen Olive Squash + 8 Rallina eurizonoides Slaty-legged Crake Gray-footed Shepherd + 9 Gallus gallus Red Junglefowl Bank Chicken Pluto Siberian Plume + 10 Heteroscelus tvipailed Tiger Gray Plover Tules + 12 Geopelia striata Zebra Dove Striped Dove + 13 Streptopelia chinensis Spotted Dove Chinese Dove Phapitreron leucotis White-eared Brown Dove White-eared Dove + 15 Chalcop nehaps indica Common Emerald Dove Pink Emerald Dove + 16 Rose Treron Green Plovedans 1st Green Pigeon + 17 Centropus viridis Philippine Coucal Philippine Coucal + 18 Centropus melanops Black-faced Coucal Black-faced Coucal + 19 Collocalia troglodytes Pygmy Swiftlet Pygmy Swiftlet + 20 Collocalia esculenta Glossy Swiftlet Light-bellied Swiftlet + 21 Cypsiurus Palmearns picina Philippine Spine-tailed Swift Philippine Needletail + 23 Apus pacificus Pacific Swift White-belted Swift + 24 Ceyx argentatus Silvery Kingfisher Silver Kingfisher + 25 Todiramphus chloris Collared Kingfisher White-necked Kingfisher + 26 Merops viridis Blue-phated Bee-eater Merops 27 Blue-throated Bee-eater 27 tailed Bee-eate Blue-tailed bee-eate + 28 Penelopides samarensis Samar Hornbill Samaria hornbill + 29 Harpactes ardens Philippine Trogon Philippine trogon + 30 Chrysocolaptes lucidus Buff-spotted Flameback Sultan woodpecker + 31 Dryocopus javentsis * White-bellied Woodpecker * White-bellied Woodpecker * White-bellied Woodpecker Philippine Scops Owl Philippine Scops Owl + 33 Ninox philippensis Philippine Hawk-Owl Philippine Needle-footed Owl + 34 Pitta steerii * Azure-breasted Pitta Azure Pitta + 35 Sarcophanops samarensis Visayan Broadbill Samaria Hornbeak + 36 Anthus ricsonhardi Richard's Piped + 37 Anthus ricsonhardi Richard's Piped + 37 Steppe Horseback Pipit Spotted Pipit + 38 Hirundo rustica Barn Swallow Barn Swallow + 39 Hirundo tahitica Pacific Swallow Pacific Swallow + 40 Lalage nigra Pied Triller Magpie + 41 Pycnonotus goiavier Yellow-vented Bulipe Red-crested Bulb philippinus Philippine Bulbul Philippine Bulbul + 44 Pycnonotus sinensis Light-vented Bulbul Chinese Bulbul +

10 45 Dicrurus hottentottus Hair-crested Drongo Lyre-tailed Drongo + 46 Copsychus saularis Oriental Magpie-Robin Sheep Shama Turdus hortulorum Gray-backed Thrush Dove Thrush + 48 Orthotomus samarensis Yellow-breasted Tailorbird + Orthopedic Tailorbird + Samaria Orthopedic Sailor Orthotomus sutorius Common Tailorbird Red-headed Dressmaker + 51 Rhinomyias ruficauda Rufous-tailed Jungle Flycatcher Red-tailed Shinymouth + 52 Muscicapa griseisticta Gray-streaked Flycatcher Pied-breasted Flycatcher + 53 Myophonus caeruleus Da Blue Whicling Thrushinus Phoenix bellied Whistler Philippine Whistler + 56 Zosterops japonicus Japanese White-eye Japanese White-eye + White-breasted 57 Artamus leucorynchus Woodswallow White-bellied Artam + 58 Lanius cristatus Brown Shrike Siberian Shrike + 59 Lanius schach nasutus Long-tailed Shrike Long-tailed Shrike + 60 Aplonis panayensis Asian Glossy Starling Malay Aplonis + 61 Gracupica nigricollis Black-collared Starling Black-necked starling + 62 Acridotheres cristatellus Crested Myna Crested Myna + 63 Cinnyris jugularis Olive-backed Sunbird Christum-bellied Sunbird 65 australe Red-keeled Flowerpecker Philippine flower beetle + 66 Dicaeum hypoleucum Buzzing Flowerpecker White-bellied flower beetle + Stachyris (Sterrhoptilus) 67 nigrocapitata Black-crowned Babbler Black-headed thymelia + 68 Phylloscopus olivaceusus Philippine leaf Warbler 69 Phylloscopus olivaceus Philippine leaf Warbler 69 Phylloscopus olivaceus jellyfish Fifty-eyed Fifty-headed frog Blue Fantail Blue Fantail + 71 Hypothymis azurea Black-naped Monarch Blue Monarch + 72 Passer montanus Eurasian Tree Sparrow Field Sparrow + 73 Lonchura malacca Tricolored Munia Tricolor Munia * - by voice

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