Bird Families

Blue-headed talasoma

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Wrasses Labridae

A huge family of marine fish, numbering about 60 genera and about 500 species. They are common in the Atlantic, Indian and Pacific Oceans. Many species reach far north, but the greatest diversity is found in tropical waters. Wrashers adhere to coastal areas, preferring stony, rocky or reef biotopes.

Wrasses are solitary, very territorial fish, in this they are helped by a bright color, letting competitors know from a distance that the site is occupied. They lead an exclusively daytime lifestyle, and with the onset of darkness they fall asleep, hiding in crevices and grottoes, burying themselves in the sand or simply wrapping their bodies in a thick slimy cocoon. They feed mainly on mollusks and other benthic invertebrates, although there are also herbivorous species. Many wrasses eat parasites from the surface of the body of large fish, using them both as food sites and as a shelter from predators.

Small (from 5 centimeters), medium, large, and even very large fish (more than two meters long), wrasses have a characteristic elongated body covered with large, well-visible scales. The dorsal fin is very wide, extended along the entire body, while the anal fin is much narrower, usually less than half the length of the body.A relatively small mouth with thick, fleshy lips is located at the very end of the triangular muzzle. In some species, the snout is elongated and elongated, which allows them to get their food from crevices and cracks. The color of wrasse is surprisingly varied, represented by all the colors of the rainbow. Plain, striped, spotted, checkerboard, they are so diverse that they often differ even from their counterparts in appearance. Age-related polymorphism is also very pronounced in many wrasses; most fry are colored in a completely different way, often brighter and more contrasting than adults.

Wrasses are an indispensable decoration for marine aquariums. Their various sizes and colors allow you to choose tenants for almost any team. Large wrasses get along well with large angel fish, surgeons and triggerfish, small wrasses - with various small fish and invertebrates. However, wrasses get along poorly with each other, it is better not to plant closely related species together. In captivity, they feed on almost any animal, live and frozen food, some species need to be fed with plant food.

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